Veteran and Vintage Cars & Planes at Pima

1915 Model T in front of the historic B-52 at Pima Air & Space Museum. Photo by Richard Johnson.
1915 Model T in front of the historic B-52 at Pima Air &  Space Museum. Photo by Richard Johnson.
1915 Model T in front of the historic B-52 at Pima Air & Space Museum. Photo by Richard Johnson.

PRESS RELEASE – The Pima Air & Space Museum announces a special showing of veteran and vintage Model Ts and Ford Model As alongside its vintage aircraft on Sunday, October 19th. Both the Old Pueblo Model A Club and the Tucson Touring Ts will line their classic beauties up on the museum grounds all day Sunday for history, car and photography buffs to admire. (NOTE: Model Ts made before 1919 are known as “veteran” cars; those manufactured after 1919 are known as “vintage” cars.)

Henry Ford’s Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Model T (aka the Tin Lizzie) from October 1st, 1908, to May 27th, 1927. Quoting Henry Ford’s goal, “I will build a motor car for the great multitude…constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise…so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one-and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God’s great open spaces.” History often refers to the Model T as the first affordable automobile that opened travel to the middle-class American. This feat was due largely to Ford’s efficient fabrication, including assembly-line production instead of individual hand crafting. Model Ts were offered only in black from 1914 to 1926 due to the cheap cost and durability of black paint, a result of Henry Ford’s famous quote, “Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black.” More than 15 million Model Ts rolled off the production lines. Half of all cars in existence at one time were Ford Model Ts.

1915 Model T with Kennedy’s “Air Force One” at Pima Air & Space. Photo by Richard Johnson.
1915 Model T with Kennedy’s “Air Force One” at Pima Air & Space. Photo by Richard Johnson.

The Ford Model A (of 1928–1931) was the second huge success for the Ford Motor Company, after the Model T. First produced in 1927, this “new” Model A (a previous model had used the name in 1903–1904) was designated as a 1928 model, and was available in four standard colors and various body styles. When production ended in March, 1932, with a grand total of 4,849,340 examples built in the various styles.

Mary E Emich, Director of Visitor Services, Marketing and Sales at the Pima Air & Space Museum recently stated of the car show, “It’s great welcoming these veteran and vintage-car enthusiasts so willing to share their passion and provide extra value for our museum visitors.” She continued, “Especially these Ford Model As and Ts as they highlight the Motor Age, when automobile and aviation technology flourished in the early 20th century.” Henry Ford predicted in 1941, “I can visualize the time when almost every family will have a small plane in their back yard.” (Source: theHenryFord.org/research).

om Wulfe, Pima Air & Space Museum volunteer, Model A & T Club member, and former pilot, with his restored Model T in front of a plane style he previously flew, an AT-6 Texan. Photo by Richard Johnson.
om Wulfe, Pima Air & Space Museum volunteer, Model A & T Club member, and former pilot, with his restored Model T in front of a plane style he previously flew, an AT-6 Texan. Photo by Richard Johnson.

This vintage car show is included with paid or member admission to the museum. Video of the Model T approaching Pima Air & Space Museum entrance circle can be downloaded from  https://www.dropbox.com/home/Public.

 

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