The Jet Age Museum Opened Its Doors

External view of the new Jet Age Museum at Gloucestershire airport which opened to the public in late August 2013 - nose of Vulcan B2 XM569 can be seen. ( Image credit Geoff Jones)
External view of the new Jet Age Museum at Gloucestershire airport which opened to the public in late August 2013 - nose of Vulcan B2 XM569 can be seen. ( Image credit Geoff Jones)
External view of the new Jet Age Museum at Gloucestershire airport
which opened to the public in late August 2013 – nose of Vulcan B2 XM569 can
be seen. ( Image credit Geoff Jones)

The Jet Age Museum in Gloucestershire,UK opened to the public in late August 2013,Warbirds News contributor Geoff Jones sent us an update on the new hangar built for the museum. In the the above picture the cockpit of the AVRO VULCAN B2 XM569 looks like  is noticeably sticking out of the building. In reality it’s just sitting right outside the building.This is a B2 cockpit on loan to the Jet Age Museum, displayed on a raised framework, with the access ladder down, for visitors to look inside. Inside the nose is in good condition with only a few missing instruments. Demand is high to visit this Cold war warrior.

The current construction project also includes a two-story lean-to structure which will add approximately 2,000 square feet of floor space that will house the JAM’s archive, a café, gift shop, and restroom facilities. Funds are still being raised for a second phase, which will see the newly-constructed main building further enlarged, permitting most of the aircraft in the museum’s collection to get under cover.

Meteor takes off from Imjin Barracks
Meteor takes off from Imjin Barracks

The museum’s latest acquisition, a Gloster Meteor T.7, after many years at RAF Imjin Barracks to the north of Gloucester where it has been on static display as a gate guardian, it was  moved to Gloucestershire where the JAM is located.The collection includes a Meteor NF.13 which was restored at Bruntingthorpe Airfield , examples of the F.8 and F.14 Meteors, a Gloster Javelin, and a very accurate reproduction Gloster Gamecock.

The jet engine was designed by British engineering genius Sir Frank Whittle (1907–1996). His son Ian is a patron of Jet Age Museum.Jet Age Museum is a member of Tewkesbury Museums Partnership, Gloucestershire Museums Group, the British Aviation Preservation Council and the Association of Independent Museums.

Previous articles about the Jet Age Museum can be read HERE.

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